Mouse Garden

Thursday, 12 March, 2009

Types of Plant Cuttings

Filed under: Garden — Admin @ 14:31

From http://www.healthrecipes.com/plant_cuttings.htm

Types of Plant Cuttings

Cuttings may be taken from stems, leaves or roots. Herbaceous stem cuttings, sometimes called slips, are commonly used. Popular plants, such as African violet and begonia, are propagated from leaf cuttings. A few plants may be propagated by cutting their long stems into segments. Others can be propagated by simple division.

Herbaceous stem cuttings. The type of stem cutting most suitable for propagating houseplants is the herbaceous cutting. It is made from tender growth of terminal shoots. Herbaceous cuttings are commonly used to propagate geranium, chrysanthemum or coleus (Figure 1). Cuttings taken from a rubber plant, dracaena or croton usually contain more woody tissue and are frequently called softwood cuttings. Techniques for taking and rooting are the same.

Leaf cuttings. Leaf cuttings include only a leaf blade or the blade and a portion of the petiole. Leaf cuttings of plants such as African violet should not be rooted with long petioles. Trim the petiole to no more than 1/2 inch in length.

If a small portion of the main plant stem containing a bud is included with the petiole, the cutting is known as a leaf-bud cutting. Their use is limited. Hydrangea and rubber plants are sometimes started by this method.

Plants from stem sections. A few houseplants may be propagated by cutting 1- to 2-inch sections from the stem. These segments, without leaves, are placed in the rooting medium in a horizontal position and covered slightly. The table below lists a few plants that may be propagated this way.

Propagation techniques for selected houseplants.

African violet
Cut petioles 1/2 inch long. Place potted leaf cuttings in plastic bag.

  • Leaf cutting
  • Division

Arrowhead (Nepthytis)
Cuttings may be rooted in water.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Compound layer
  • Division

Asparagus fern
Keep young divisions constantly moist.

  • Division

Begonia
May be started from leaf sections placed on surface of rooting medium. Cleanliness important.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Leaf cutting

Bromeliads
Use well-drained medium high in organic matter. Orchid growing mix useful.

  • Division

Cast iron plant
Provide good light after division.

  • Division

Chinese evergreen
May be rooted or grown in water.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Stem section

Christmas cactus
Keep moist, but avoid overwatering during rooting.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Chrysanthemum
Cuttings from new shoots in early spring often make better garden plants than divisions.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Division

Coleus
Root in water. Easiest of all.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Croton
Slow to root. Cover with plastic. Give good light.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Air layer

Diffenbachia
Subject to rot during rooting. Do not overwater. Keep clean.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Stem section
  • Air layer

Dracaena
Stem sections relatively slow.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Stem section
  • Air layer

English ivy
Easy to root. Sometimes slow starting.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Compound layer

Episcia
Related to African violet. Tip cuttings grow faster than leaf cuttings.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Leaf cutting

Ferns
Keep constantly moist after division.

  • Division

Fuschia
Root easily. Prefers a cool temperature after rooting.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Gardenia
Vigorous new shoots root most easily in midsummer.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Geranium
Keep foliage dry during rooting.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Gloxinia
May be grown from leaf cuttings.

  • Leaf cutting

Hibiscus
Rooting hormones speed root production. Give bright light.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Hydrangea
Tend to root best in spring or early summer.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Impatiens
Very easy. May be rooted in water.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Jade plant
Keep fairly dry during rooting. Must have well-drained medium, e.g., coarse sand.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Leaf cutting

Kalanchoe
Use vegetative shoots, not flowering shoots for best rooting.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Leaf cutting

Lantana
Old, woody stems do not root as easily as more tender terminal shoots.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Maidenhair fern
Keep divisions constantly moist.

  • Division

Norfolk Island pine
Very slow. Use only terminal cutting.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Air layer

Orchid
Many types. Provide high humidity and well-drained organic medium.

  • Division

Peperomia
Root easily. Avoid excess moisture during rooting.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Leaf cutting

Philodendron
May be rooted in water. Spring and early summer give quickest rooting.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Compound layer

Poinsettia
Propagate in late August for home. Cleanliness important.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Pothos
Will root in water. Spring and early summer propagation usually most successful.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Compound layer

Rubber plant
Keep humidity high during rooting, or use air layer.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Air layer

Schefflera
Needs high humidity and bright light. Slow rooting.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Air layer

Shrimp plant
Easy to root. Give good light.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Snake plant
Place leaf sections in same position they grew. Will not root upside down.

  • Leaf cutting
  • Division

Spider plant
Very easy to root runners. Pot directly in soil mixture.

  • Division
  • Leaf cutting

Wandering jew
Very easy. May be rooted in water.

  • Herbaceous cutting

Wax plant (Hoya)
Use leafy shoots, not long thin vines.

  • Herbaceous cutting
  • Compound layer

Zebra plant
Use nonflowering shoots. Give high humidity and good light.

  • Herbaceous cutting
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2 Comments »

  1. […] Division is the easiest method of multiplying plants that naturally produce offsets or basal shoots. These new shoots usually have a few roots and can be separated and planted individually. Some plants suitable for division are listed in the table on this page. […]

    Pingback by How to Root Plant Cuttings « Web Mouse — Thursday, 12 March, 2009 @ 14:58 | Reply

  2. Cool blog Thanks Karl

    Comment by karlbarrett — Saturday, 15 August, 2009 @ 07:46 | Reply


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